Housing Action Plan

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Last year, the City began developing a Housing Action Plan to help address Delta’s current and future housing needs.

For Phase 1 of this project, we conducted a Housing Needs Assessment with residents and stakeholders to better understand Delta’s current housing situation and decide what are Delta’s priority needs for housing. The key areas we identified are:







Draft Housing Strategies

The City is now in Phase 2 and choosing strategies to meet those needs. We are looking for community input on some possible strategies and actions the City is considering implementing over the next five years.

1. Promote priority housing through 'sliding scale’ incentives
2. Explore ways to increase land availability for priority housing
3. Create opportunities for gentle density
4. Introduce renter protection policies
5. Increase the number of accessible units in Delta
6. Pilot pre-zoning in select areas near town centres
7. Introduce inclusionary zoning policies

Watch this short video for a short description of the housing strategies the City is considering.


We want your input

Please complete out our guided feedback questionnaire by clicking on the ‘Feedback Form' button below. The questionnaire is open until December 7, 2020.

Next steps

Once virtual consultation closes, the public input received will be used to help develop the City’s draft Housing Action Plan. The draft Plan is expected to be presented to Delta Council in Spring 2021 and will be followed by a final round of virtual public consultation.




Last year, the City began developing a Housing Action Plan to help address Delta’s current and future housing needs.

For Phase 1 of this project, we conducted a Housing Needs Assessment with residents and stakeholders to better understand Delta’s current housing situation and decide what are Delta’s priority needs for housing. The key areas we identified are:







Draft Housing Strategies

The City is now in Phase 2 and choosing strategies to meet those needs. We are looking for community input on some possible strategies and actions the City is considering implementing over the next five years.

1. Promote priority housing through 'sliding scale’ incentives
2. Explore ways to increase land availability for priority housing
3. Create opportunities for gentle density
4. Introduce renter protection policies
5. Increase the number of accessible units in Delta
6. Pilot pre-zoning in select areas near town centres
7. Introduce inclusionary zoning policies

Watch this short video for a short description of the housing strategies the City is considering.


We want your input

Please complete out our guided feedback questionnaire by clicking on the ‘Feedback Form' button below. The questionnaire is open until December 7, 2020.

Next steps

Once virtual consultation closes, the public input received will be used to help develop the City’s draft Housing Action Plan. The draft Plan is expected to be presented to Delta Council in Spring 2021 and will be followed by a final round of virtual public consultation.



For the ease of responding, please stick to one strategy or a single question per submission.  You can submit as many questions as you like. 

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    Is this a Socialist move to drive the "middle class" out of delta and replace them with the people you have depicted in the artistic images? The logo IS "Housing the future"!! My specific question is what will Delta do SPECIFICALLY to ensure the people being brought into the area are assisted in becoming income earning and contributing members of society?

    Mohammed asked 4 months ago

    Thanks for your question. The goal of the Housing Action Plan is not to displace a particular group or segment of the population, but rather to look for ways to allow people who wish to live in Delta (either new residents, or current residents looking to move) the opportunity to do so. For example, that could mean accessible housing near neighbourhood centres for seniors or those with disabilities, it could mean three bedroom units for families, or it could mean below-market housing for people with low to medium incomes. There are a myriad of options being explored through this phase of the project.

    With respect to how new residents might earn incomes, that is outside the scope of this project.

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    My observation is that many single detached homes that get demolished for redevelopment are replaced by a home that is much larger, has 7 to 10 roof-gables (each an unnecessary expense) and with no sign of a secondary suite. This is no way to increase affordability and density. What can Delta do to discourage this practice while still offering the property owner and/or developer a reasonable financial return?

    Chris asked 4 months ago

    Thanks for your question. The idea behind concepts like "gentle density", where we have slight increases in the population of a neighbourhood over time, is to encourage things like duplexes, triplexes, fourplexes, suites, etc. The exact mechanism of how those are encouraged would still require more work, as simply permitting them through zoning may not be enough. Indeed, there are single detached neighbourhoods throughout Delta that already permit duplexes outright through zoning, but for various reasons, those who choose to build a new home choose to build a single detached home (with or without a suite). What that indicates is that perhaps simply allowing these new types of buildings may be insufficient, so that would be something that would be evaluated if gentle density is a strategy that is pursued through the Housing Action Plan.

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    Does the housing strategy consider public transport constraints? I believe that any housing increase, whether through increased density, infill or greenfield development should be accompanied by improvements in roads and public transport - and preferably precede the sale or rental of the new housing units. If public transport is not expanded beforehand, only new tenants/residents who are "vehicle-oriented" will move in, thereby exacerbating the suburban parking and road pressures that others have warned of. What influence does Delta have over the provision of public transport?

    Chris asked 4 months ago

    Thanks for your question. In the case of transit-oriented development, or development that takes place close to rapid transit, the transit generally precedes the development. A prime example is the Skytrain, where most of the residential density you see built, and being built, takes place after that transportation infrastructure exists. A similar pattern is expected to follow the introduction of a Rapid Bus line along Scott Road/120 Street, and that is something that the City is currently planning for. On the other end of the spectrum, increasing bus services in lower density areas often follows development, as TransLink is unlikely to run buses in areas where the ridership is not present to support that service. It is a challenging chicken and egg scenario, and while the City does not directly influence TransLink's services, input of the City in the form of population projections and planned density increases do help to inform TransLink's decisions on where those services are needed most.

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    Why do all the new growth of Townhomes on the 72 street corridor not have a parkades as part of there plan just like condos Already we have parking all over are side streets and neighbours are parking there own vehicles on the street to stop this leaving there driveways and carports empty People do not uses there garages they are full of stuff which is proven over and over and over again anywhere you look

    P Restiaux asked 4 months ago
    Thanks for your comment and for engaging with us on this platform.  Please note that this consultation is on the Housing Action Plan that is looking at proposed strategies to provide housing needed by the residents of Delta.  You may wish to refer to Part 8 of the Delta Zoning Bylaw for more information on Delta’s parking requirements for single detached dwellings, secondary suites and townhouses.  72 Avenue is also located within the Community Corridor (CC) development permit area, which includes design guidelines for site layout and parking in new developments.  Should you have more specific questions or wish to speak to a planner more generally about Delta’s parking requirements, please contact Community Planning & Development at 604-946-3380 or cpd@delta.ca.
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    I agree, additional conditions for housing is necessary in order for our community to grow. However, improved roads with easy access to accommodate the extra residential housing is essential to be thought of in conjunction with this study. In TSW here, 52nd Avenue, single lane, is continually heavy in volume of traffic throughout the day, with long line-ups at intersections. Is this also being considered?

    Ian B asked 4 months ago

    Thanks for your question. The Housing Action Plan is looking at various ways to provide the housing needed by the residents of Delta, both current and future. While this phase of the project does not specifically address traffic, any proposed changes to an area's density (e.g., allowing townhouses in an area currently occupied by single detached houses) will take into consideration the infrastructure requirements that such a change would require.

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    Density and affordability often go hand in hand where land is expensive. Currently density, and therefore affordability, is heavily discouraged in Delta through a few primary means: outdated units per hectare metrics are used to limit density in a way that is totally mismatched with housing goals, excessive parking requirements for many housing types and locations, and an OCP (2005) that is generally stale relative to the world we live in. Will some of the other existing policies be considered for revision as means to support housing goals that work for the future, rather than being diluted by existing regulations? This isn't something that we will have great success in if we do it too timidly.

    JeremyStam asked 4 months ago

    Thanks for your question. While this phase of the Housing Action Plan is at a bit of a higher, conceptual level in terms of potential strategies, diving further into some potential actions that can be taken will certainly require re-evaluating other policies and regulations that may work against the goal of housing affordability. If there are any particular policies or regulations that you think should be evaluated as the Housing Action Plan progresses, please don't hesitate to reach out to housingactionplan@delta.ca with your thoughts, and stay engaged as we move through the project towards more concrete strategies in Phase 3.

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    How does the environment figure into this discussion? Could projects which aim to address social goals receive further incentives if they went above and beyond from an environmental or energy efficiency perspective?

    JeremyStam asked 4 months ago

    Thanks for your question. Environmental initiatives and policies are outside the scope of what is described through the Housing Action Plan, but that is not to say the two are distinct issues. Indeed, protecting Delta's environment is an important matter for the City, and ensuring that new housing is not overly detrimental to the environment is a key issue throughout all development in Delta. I will also note that staff are currently undertaking a review of the City's Green Growth Index, which aims to encourage and incentivize more sustainable development.

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    Will there be any new Co-op housing developments in the next few years?

    karrow asked 4 months ago

    Thanks for your question. I'm not aware of any being constructed at this time, but co-op housing is a valuable housing resource for any City, and Delta would be interested in exploring how more could be brought on line in the future. Perhaps try reaching out to the Co-op Housing Federation of BC, and they may be able to point you in the direction of current or future co-op housing in the city.

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    The housing needs assessment report states, "Repurposing underutilized sites, like church properties, to provide housing and amenities" However you just denied this is happening in response to my previous question. Please acknowledge this. SO please elaborate, because I only see that churches are on the chopping block (places Christians go), what about other places of worship.... Why are only churches mentioned?

    Mohammed asked 4 months ago

    Repurposing underutilized sites is a potential strategy that is being explored. If that property is already owned by (or could potentially be purchased by) Delta, then the City could look into acting as one of the main partners in its redevelopment. For other non-City-owned sites, such as places of worship, the City could potentially act as a partner in such a project, could facilitate connections with non-profit housing associations or other governmental bodies like BC Housing, or look for other methods of helping such developments. These are options being investigated through this process, and none are set in stone.

    To be clear: no churches, mosques, or other religious facilities are "on the chopping block" from the City, nor is the City pushing for such changes to take place. If a religious organization wishes to better utilize their land, the City could potentially act as a resource, but ultimately it is their land and their decision.

    The specific use of the word "church", rather than mentioning all types or denominations of places of worship, was an oversight, and was not intended to exclude any particular groups. Indeed, there may be other land-holding organizations in Delta who wish to discuss better use of their land, and the City would welcome those discussions.

    If you wish to discuss further, please feel free to reach out to the Housing Action Plan team at housingactionplan@delta.ca.

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    with changing the zoning in neighborhoods to allow more rentals. How will parking be addressed ? image if every home or every other home had a rental. Say landlord has 2 cars basement has 2 cars where is everyone going to park ? In my neighborhood parking already in issue. this will make it worse. Whats the plan to deal with this issue ?

    Deno asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for your question. Parking in neighbourhoods is certainly something that would be considered through changes in zoning. The prezoning that is being considered is for medium and high density developments (e.g., apartment buildings), which are required to provide all resident and visitor parking on site. Similarly, single detached neighbourhoods are already required to provide two parking spaces for the main dwelling and one space for the secondary suite on site, which would be the same model followed for any of the other "gentle density" options that might be evaluated. That said, the City does not currently regulate where residents park (with the exception of No Parking areas), so the decision to park on the street is up to those residents. Street parking is a shared resource on public land, and does not belong to any particular residence. If there is a particularly problematic area and you wish to file a formal complaint, please contact the Property Use and Compliance department at 604-946-3340 or bylawenforce@delta.ca.